Chicken Dinner

Sometimes simple is best.


Roast chicken; sautéed peppers and green beans, Tuscan style; steamed rice and heirloom tomatoes

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One measure of a good cook is roast chicken. These days, I prefer Thomas Keller’s method for mon poulet rôti. It’s the essence of simplicity, a philosophy that underlies most of my cooking. Pat a chicken dry with paper towels, sprinkle with salt and pepper throughout (and in its cavity), truss with kitchen twine, then roast in a pre-heated oven at 450 F for one hour. The result: juicy, tender meat paired with stunningly crisp chicken skin. The skin alone is worth the price of admission. It’s delicious with a capital “D”.

I should mention that the chicken was bought at USGM this past weekend. Its provenance is from Flying Pigs Farm in Shushan, New York. The flavor blew me away. There’s simply no comparison to regular supermarket chicken. Score one for local food and sustainable farming.

The best part is a week’s worth of leftovers. Chicken sandwiches, chicken fried rice, chicken pot pie. Long after tonight’s dinner, the carcass gets reborn as the base for chicken stock, some of which will go towards congee, the rest for soup or whatever might strike my fancy. Very little gets wasted in Spamwise’s kitchen.

Sautéed peppers and green beans, Tuscan style

Here, mixed bell peppers are briefly sautéed with some heirloom green beans and onion in olive oil until tender. I was going to use some leftover yellow plum tomatoes originally. I’ll probably roast those later in the week or use in a bread salad tomorrow night.

4 bell peppers, sliced (choose a variety)
1 onion, sliced
Green beans, trimmed
olive oil
kosher salt
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar (optional)
chopped parsley

Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add onion and sauté until onion becomes translucent, about 3 to 4 minutes. Add green beans and peppers. Add a pinch of salt to the skillet. Cook vegetables, stirring frequently, until peppers have softened and beans are tender, about 10 minutes. Remove from heat. Check seasoning, add a tablespoon of balsamic vinegar if desired and toss. Sprinkle with chopped parsley and serve immediately.

Dry Roasted Chicken on Foodista

7 thoughts

    • Beer-can chicken is something I’ve heard of but I’ll never get to experience because of shortcomings living in a New York City apartment.

      But maybe things will change in the future.

      The neat thing with Keller’s method is that you can do almost anything you want afterwards. No extra flavors like herbs or garlic to mess things up. The gravy/pan drippings are an extra bonus.

      Like

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